Search
Close
search
 

About the College

  • home
  • About the College
  • Faculty
  • Biological Sciences

Faculty - Biological Sciences

게시글 검색
All
more
  • Professor
  • BAE, YONG-SOO 홈페이지 바로가기

[Research Interest]

I am interested in following three research fields: 1) As a first project, we have been focusing on the molecular differentiation of DC subsets from bone marrow progenitor cells and their immunogenicity and immune regulation. 2) Second project is the study on the role and functions of p53 and PKR under stress conditions, such as HIV-1 infection, genotoxic stresses, inflammatory stresses etc. 3) Third project is a development of mucosal CTL vaccines using poliovirus vector system.

more
  • Professor
  • YI, LEE S.H.

[Research Interest]

Male Reproduction

more
  • Professor
  • LEE, CHOONG-EUN

[Research Interest]

The current research focus is on the modulators of cytokine signaling (SOCS) action to control inflammation and tumor progression using in vitro and in vivo model systems

more
  • Professor
  • LEE, WOOSUNG
more
  • Professor
  • PARK, YOUNGMIN

[Research Interest]

more
  • Professor
  • KIM, CHEORL-HO 홈페이지 바로가기

[Research Interest]

Research interests are on glycomics and glycobiology, expecially on sphingolipid, ceramide and sialic acid-containing sphingolipids, ganglioside. Academic findings: Hepatic B Viral hepatocarcinoma and PTEN (Cancer Res 2003), asialo-1 acid glycoprotein in liver cirrhosis and carcinoma (Hepatol Res, 2003), GlcNAc:βMan1,4GlcNAcT-III in hepatitis (Glycoconj J, 2003), plasma MMP-9/2 and α-fetoproteins in HBV chronic hepatitis (J. Gastroent Hepatol 2004), HBV metastatic potential (FASEB J. 2004), Hepatic V and GnT-III-Apolipoprotein B (JBC. 2004), Disialo GD3 in VSMC responses (JBC. 2004), therapeutic hepatocarcinoma cells (FASEB J. 2004), Transglutaminase 2 signaling in leukemia (FEBS Lett. 2004), bisecting N-GlcNAcT-III in HBV (J Gastroent Hepatol, 2004), Monosialyl GM3 in leukemic differentiation (Glycobiology 2005), MMP-9 in In Vitro Fertilization (British J Obstetrics and Gynecology 2005), disialo GD3 Fas-induced T cells (Glycobiology 2006), GM3 in PTEN-mediated progression (Glycobiology 2006), ROS in sialic GD3-cell function (FASEB J 2006), AP-2a in GM3-PTEN (Glycobiology 2008), sialidase in leukemia (Biochim Biophys Acta 2008), GM3-VEGFR-2 interaction (Glycobiology 2009), GD3 in breast cancer cells (Biological Chemistry 2009), pig CMAH and N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Biochem J 2010), pST6GalNAc IV for Neu5Aca2-3Galb1-3GalNAc (Glycoconj J 2011), GM3 in TGF-β1-induced EMT (Biochem J. 2013), VEGFR-2 in neovascularization (J Mol Medicine 2013), monosialyl GMs (Plos One 2014) and TGF-receptor interaction (Int. J. of Biochem. Cell Biol. 2014), Sialyl Le A/X preference of HBx (Mol Cancer 2014, J Cell Biochem 2015).

more
  • Professor
  • LEE, JAE-SEONG 홈페이지 바로가기

[Research Interest]

oxidative stress, DNA repair, marine genomics, ecotoxicology, whole genome

more
  • Professor
  • KIM, JEONGHA 홈페이지 바로가기

[Research Interest]

Marine Ecology Laboratory of Sungkyunkwan University carries out a variety of research projects concerning Korean marine environments, which include 1) ecological monitoring of marine benthic habitats with regard to global warming and seawater temperature changes, 2) population ecological works of introduced species and endangered species for their conservation perspectives, 3) molecular ecological works on populations of seaweeds and marine invertebrates, 4) urchin barrens (백화현상) and recovery of kelp forest. Most of these projects have been conducted with international and domestic research co-work teams. Researches in my lab covers from field experimental works to molecular ecological works.

more
  • Professor
  • KIM, SEUNG CHUL 홈페이지 바로가기

[Research Interest]

I am primarily interested in systematics and evolutionary biology of plants. In particular, I am interested in the origin and evolution of plant endemics on oceanic islands, including the Macaronesian Islands in the Atlantic Ocean and Jeju and Ulleung Island in Korea. I am also interested in revealing complex evolutionary history of polyploidy and homoploidy lineages of flowering plants. Additional research interests include conservation genetics of rare and endangered species, population genetics of invasive weedy species, ethnobotany, plant domestication, and phylogeography of east Asian plants. A variety of techniques and molecular markers are utilized to unravel the phylogenetic patterns and underlying processes generating plant diversity.

more
  • Professor
  • CHOI, CHEOLYONG 홈페이지 바로가기

[Research Interest]

Phosphorylation and ubiquitination are reversible post-translational modifications with key roles in various signal transduction cascades. Currently, cancer cell-specific metabolic adaptation is a hot issue to be addressed. The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway integrates both intracellular and extracellular signals and serves as a central regulator of cell metabolism, growth, proliferation and survival. The mTOR pathway is activated during various cellular processes such as tumor formation and angiogenesis, insulin resistance, adipogenesis and is deregulated in human diseases such as cancer and diabetes. Although ubiquitination of target protein plays a critical role in other cellular activity during tumorigenesis, little is known about functional relevance of ubiquitin-mediated coordination of mTOR pathway and autophagy induction. So we have interested in the deciphering molecular networks of signaling pathway particularly associated with human diseases caused by malfunction of nutrient sensing.

more
  • Professor
  • PARK, SEOKHEE 홈페이지 바로가기

[Research Interest]

TGF-beta is a pivotal cytokine which is involved in a variety of cellular functions. Our group has been focused on the signaling pathways mediated by TGF-beta superfamily cytokines regarding cancer progression and anti-inflammation during the past decade. Our current research focuses on the identification of novel mechanism of TGF-beta or BMP-mediated tumorigenesis and metastasis. In addition, we are also doing the studies about how specific signaling pathways in the inflammation and cancer biology are regulated by ubiquitination and deubiquitinating mechanism. Through these diverse approaches, the final goal in our group is to understand the molecular mechanisms regarding cancer and inflammation and subsequently to identify therapeutic target proteins to treat cancer and inflammation.

more
  • Professor
  • LEE, SANGHO 홈페이지 바로가기

[Research Interest]

Life is controlled by a milieu of macromolecular interactions. We focus on understanding structural basis for protein interactions and their applications using a variety of biophysical and biochemical techniques such as crystallography and solution scattering as well as standard techniques in molecular cell biology. We study proteins interactions in ubiquitin signaling, host-pathogen relationship and abiotic stress response signaling. We also develop mini-antibody based bionano sensors for both diagnostic and therapeutic purposes.

more
  • Professor
  • BAE, YOE SIK

[Research Interest]

We are interested in the development of bioactive molecules that can be used to treat infectious or inflammatory diseases. Our major target diseases include polymicrobial sepsis, rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, and colon cancer. To generate useful target molecules that can be used to develop therapeutic agents against these infectious or inflammatory diseases, we are focusing on several chemoattractant G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). Since leukocyte trafficking in vivo is a crucial event that modulate immune and inflammatory responses, and chemotactic GPCRs mediate these response, the receptors can be considered as important primary targets to control infectious or inflammatory disorders. Currently, we are testing the effects and mechanism of action of chemotactic GPCR ligands against these diseases in experimental animal models.

more
  • Professor
  • KWON, JAEYOUNG 홈페이지 바로가기

[Research Interest]

All animals are born with a set of instincts, or innate behaviors, and our main questions are how complex behaviors are organized in the nervous system and how they are programmed during development. For this, the chemosensory system would be one of the most excellent models. Smell and taste are known to be important for sensing predators, selecting mates as well as finding food. We would like to trace the neuronal pathways that mediate a complex instinctive behavior such as feeding, from sensory input through to motor output. We are using the fruit fly as a model system to study chemosensation.

more
  • Associate Professor
  • YOON, HWAN SU

[Research Interest]

Hwan Su Yoon is an Associate Professor in the Department of Biological Sciences at Sungkyunkwan University, Korea. He received his PhD in biology from Chungnam National University. After research training at the University of Iowa, he worked at the Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences. His research interests include eukaryotic biodiversity, phylogeny, single cell genomics, and genome evolution, with a focus on red algae and red algal plastid descendants (e.g., the cryptophytes, haptophytes, stramenopiles, and dinoflagellates).

more
  • Assistant Professor
  • KIM, JINSUB
  • +82-31-290-7014
  • Natural Sciences 2 3F 32362

[Research Interest]

Computational neuroscience of Connectomics. Connectome is the entire synaptic connections of all the neurons in the brain. A Connectome is equivalent to the identity of an individual, since it is the origin of all the brain functions including cognition, memory, and personality. Computational neuroscience regards the neural circuits as biological computers and study the mathematical principles on which the brain works. Finding the working principles of the brain together with the differences of individuals will lead to the complete understanding of ourselves. Toward these ultimate goals, we investigate the neural connectivity and activity from electron microscope brain images and other experiment data using computer technologies including artificial intelligence. Current projects cover various brain regions for various brain functions, including the retina for perception, the cerebral cortex for cognition, and the cerebellar cortex for motion control.

more
  • Assistant Professor
  • JUNG, JAE HOON

[Research Interest]

Role of plant prion-like proteins in temperature sensing Plant temperature sensing mechanism through the process of phase separation Role of reactive oxygen species in transmitting temperature signals

more
  • Assistant Professor
  • CHO, HONGBAEK

[Research Interest]

Bacterial cell wall assembly Maintenance of cell envelope integrity during assembly of trans-envelope complexes Antibiotic resistance and persistence